About Renaissance Main Street

Mission Statement
Background
Top Five Priorities/Initiatives
Four Point Approach
The Secretary Of The Interior's Standards For Rehabilitation
Available Sites
National Register Historic Districts vs. Local Historic Districts

Mission Statement

"Our mission is to improve the image of downtown Campbellsville as well as aid, encourage, promote and support its economic structure through organization, promotions, design and economic restructuring."

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Background

Campbellsville, Kentucky, was established by the Kentucky General Assembly in 1817 as the seat of Taylor County. The Civil War Battle of Tebbs Bend was fought here in 1863 and several local historic sites reflect that time period. Campbellsville is host to one of the biggest 4th of July celebrations in the state. More than 25,000 people turn out for fireworks, country music concerts, and more. Historic downtown Campbellsville offers 190 businesses and services. Currently, it is a class 3 city with Campbellsville University and received a National Economic Development Award in 2004.

Historic Resource Surveys and National Register Nominations have been conducted in Campbellsville and Taylor County on a regular basis since 1975. Fifty-nine historic resources in Campbellsville and 115 resources in Taylor County have been recorded on Kentucky Historic Resources Inventory Forms. In 1983, 41 historic resources in the Campbellsville Commercial Historic District were listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

In 2001, a group of concerned citizens worked together to prepare the Silver Renaissance Kentucky application and were appointed to the Campbellsville Renaissance/Historic Preservation Commission in 2002 as mandated by the Historic Design Ordinance. That fall, Campbellsville was designated a Silver Renaissance Kentucky City and a Main Street community.

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Top Five Priorities/Initiatives

  • The identification, preservation and restoration of historic structures, including but not limited to those structures within the Renaissance boundary.
  • To examine Streetscape and Parking Issues and develop appropriate courses of action for improvement, utility, beautification and safety.
  • To develop and implement a strategy that addresses commercial development, residential housing, and infill construction within the Renaissance boundary.
  • To identify, create and implement Greenspace and Environmental Enhancement Plan to address issues such as trails, parks, greenways, waterways, recreational areas, etc. within the Renaissance boundary.
  • To study the Marketing Plan and devise a plan including business recruitment, retention and expansion within the Renaissance boundary.
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Four Point Approach

ORGANIZATION: Building partnerships to create a consistent revitalization program and develop effective management and leadership of the downtown.

ECONOMIC RESTRUCTURING: Strengthening the existing economic assets of the business district while diversifying its economic base.

PROMOTION: Re-establishing downtown as a compelling place for shoppers, investors and visitors.

DESIGN: Enhancing the visual quality of downtown by concentrating on design in all elements of the downtown environment.

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The Secretary Of The Interior's Standards For Rehabilitation

  1. A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristics of the building and its site and environment.
  2. The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved. The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided.
  3. Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken.
  4. Most properties change over time; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved.
  5. Distinctive features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a historic property shall be preserved.
  6. Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualities and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features shall be substantiated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence.
  7. Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, that cause damage to historic materials shall not be used. The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible.
  8. Significant archaeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures shall be undertaken.
  9. New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property. The new work shall be differentiated from the old and shall be compatible with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment.
  10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

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